Sartor Resartus

Sartor Resartus (meaning 'The tailor re-tailored') is an 1836 novel by Thomas Carlyle, first published as a serial in Fraser's Magazine in November 1833–August 1834. The novel purports to be a commentary on the thought and early life of a German philosopher called Diogenes Teufelsdröckh (which translates as 'god-born devil-dung'), author of a tome entitled Clothes: Their Origin and Influence, but is actually a poioumenon. Teufelsdröckh's Transcendentalist musings are mulled over by a sceptical English Reviewer (referred to as Editor) who also provides fragmentary biographical material on the philosopher. The work is, in part, a parody of Hegel, and of German Idealism more generally. However, Teufelsdröckh is also a literary device with which Carlyle can express difficult truths.

Book I

Book II

Book III

Chapter 1. Incident in Modern History.

As a wonder-loving and wonder-seeking man, Teufelsdrockh, from an early part of this Clothes-Volu...

Chapter 2. Church-Clothes.

Not less questionable is his Chapter on Church-Clothes, which has the farther distinction of bein...

Chapter 3. Symbols.

Probably it will elucidate the drift of these foregoing obscure utterances, if we here insert som...

Chapter 4. Helotage.

At this point we determine on adverting shortly, or rather reverting, to a certain Tract of Hofra...

Chapter 5. The Phoenix.

Putting which four singular Chapters together, and alongside of them numerous hints, and even dir...

Chapter 6. Old Clothes.

As mentioned above, Teufelsdrockh, though a Sansculottist, is in practice probably the politest m...

Chapter 7. Organic Filaments.

For us, who happen to live while the World-Phoenix is burning herself, and burning so slowly that...

Chapter 8. Natural Supernaturalism.

It is in his stupendous Section, headed Natural Supernaturalism, that the Professor first becomes...

Chapter 9. Circumspective.

Here, then, arises the so momentous question: Have many British Readers actually arrived with us ...

Chapter 10. The Dandiacal Body.

First, touching Dandies, let us consider, with some scientific strictness, what a Dandy specially...

Chapter 11. Tailors.

Thus, however, has our first Practical Inference from the Clothes-Philosophy, that which respects...

Chapter 12. Farewell.

So have we endeavored, from the enormous, amorphous Plum-pudding, more like a Scottish Haggis, wh...

Appendix

This questionable little Book was undoubtedly written among the mountain solitudes, in 1831; but,...

Search Results